Rose Curves, Tattoos, and Weekly Journals

Last year and the year before, I stared every Thursday’s class with a journal entry. The students wrote to me in response to the questions “how was your week?,” and “what did we do?,” as well as some third thing. This third thing was almost always a writing prompt about the math that we had done that week, or that we were about to do. Then I wrote back to them on little post-it notes. It created this nice sense of ownership of their learning, offered them a chance to reflect on and write about their week of mathematics, and provided a space to give me feedback about the class. I would always dread reading these on weeks I had deemed bad, but nobody ever wrote anything terribly negative.

Towards the end of last year I stopped doing this. I felt that it was taking too much time out of the day Thursday, which at our school is only scheduled to last 30 minutes (impossibly short!). I also felt that writing only one day out of the week wasn’t organic since the most prompt-worthy topics might have been covered on Monday. I told myself I would have them stop and write every week whenever it seemed like a good time to put math into sentences, but since the schedule wasn’t forcing me to do it, I hadn’t been since.

NEW SOLUTION: weekly journals will still be due each week, but there is no specific class time carved out to do them. They are expected by class on Monday, and students can do them after school, in the morning, over the weekend, and whenever they get done early in class. I will see if it works and let you know. I already got a “good luck with that” from one fellow teacher.

I polled the math 4 students about journals (yes or no about bringing them back) on an assignment from Monday involving plenty of purposeful writing. I will likely do a whole separate post about that because my polar unit got really excellent this year, but basically they had to discuss the visual and numeric patterns of the number of petals on rose curves with fractional coefficients. This is the best visual that I have found for that. I summarized the results on excel:

tats roses

In addition to the more mathematical questions, I asked them about the journal (the aye’s have it! good thing I was going to re-institute it anyway!) and which rose curve I should get as a tattoo. Yet another thing to stay tuned for – new math tattoo!

My major conclusion right now is that I should do more polls. When I was in high school we would do this thing we called “carpool car poll” where anyone could just declare a poll and we’d all have to say our opinions on a topic. I want a catchy phrase like that and more chances to give opinions.

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