Factoring Amazing Race

Sometimes I have a strong temptation to use my blog solely for successes and never mention anything that isn’t great within my classroom. But I recently had a realization so simple that I don’t know how my teaching could possibly have been effective before it! Realization: students won’t work together effectively until they are together on a team.

kids amazing racing

We had this excellent all-school camping trip last week, but as a consequence class did not take place for an entire week. I was concerned that they would have forgotten everything, so for my Math 2 class I created an Amazing Race game to review and practice binomial factoring. All along I had been encouraging them to work together and ask each other questions, but everyone was either lost and totally un-focused, or focused on doing their own work, not motivated to help others.

amazing race cards

I had them in 3 groups for the Amazing Race. I put three students who were on the verge of full understanding with an extremely competent but extremely quiet student. My thinking was that the quiet student could shine and the on-the-verge students would quietly listen in order to gain full understanding. This group was fairly effective although never fully cohesive – I mainly saw them interacting one-one-one rather than as a full group. I put four on-the-verge but potentially less-motivated students together so that they would all have to participate fully in order to understand. This went well – some of the best conversations came out of this group. Then I put a brilliant and patient student with a very silly but very smart student and two students on the struggle bus. I think that at least one of the strugglers is doing really well after that, but the other one is still struggling. I’m feeling sad about this but I’ll catch up with her on Make Up Work Day.