Group Norms

Working collaboratively is an incredibly important skill, and increasingly so. So in addition to teaching math, I’ve been working on strategies for teaching communication and collaboration skills.

I got a jump on this during bonding week this year. Every year we divide the school into small groups of maybe 5 or 6 and task them with creating boats. We have this rotation – year 1 these boats are strictly cardboard and duct tape, year 2 strictly trash bags and duct tape, and year 3 cardboard, trash bags, and duct tape. It’s year 3 but this picture is from last year:

boats for blog

Chaos, right? But super fun chaos, and we get more buy-in than you’d expect. Even still, we had noticed this tendency for boat group communication to be subpar. The groups would usually defer to the ideas of whoever was loudest, kids sometimes got mad that their idea didn’t feel listened to, and without a teacher consistently in the room (which would ruin it in other ways), it was totally OK to not participate for kids who didn’t feel like it.

So this year we had them do limited-resource challenges in small groups, and then reflect on these group dynamics upon entering their boat groups. We orchestrated the groups so that nobody was in a group with someone they just worked with, so they could talk openly about their experience. I wrote up a set of reflection questions:

Communication Discussion Questions:
1. What was the most challenging part of communicating with your previous group?
2. Did you feel that your ideas were listened to?
3. Did you always feel comfortable sharing your ideas?
4. Did you feel that you listened to other ideas? Why/ why not?
5. What qualities in someone else make them easy to communicate/collaborate with?
6. What qualities in someone else make them difficult to communicate/collaborate with?
7. Do you find it helpful when someone steps up to be the leader, or does that make you more reluctant to share?
8. What can you do as a group member to make sure nobody is dominating the discussion?
9. What can you do as a group member to make sure quieter people are joining in?
10. What can you do as a group member to make the decision-making process easier?

So now in my math 2 class we’ve started our first group task, the rectangle pattern task I discovered last year. Before breaking into groups we went over the group norms, based on concepts we talked about in my college classes and the book Designing Groupwork by Elizabeth Cohen. Group norms:

For a productive group…
1) Stay in your group
2) Ask the other group members first
3) Everyone is accountable for what the group is doing
4) You are responsible to ask for and offer help

I like the last one best although the first one is a close second.

Best question ever: “wait – are we doing this to practice working in groups or to learn the math?” Answer – both!!! I think I exclaimed that with three exclamation points in class as well.

Tomorrow we finish the task in math 2 and launch the vector fields task in math 4.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s